Ask Richard

Help and advice on questions of local and family history relating to Brierley area.

 

In the many years I spent researching my booklet ‘Brereley a History of Brierley’ published in 1974 and now available on the internet I built up an extensive archive of documents relating to the Brierley area. Much of it unused in the booklet. This has helped me to advise quite a few people on questions of local and family history. Pages on my web site relating to the Beatrice Tomasson at Burntwood and the Wood House known as Sidlow’s at Grimethorpe are an example of what can be achieved. 

 

I do not undertake research that cannot be completed at home, but can advise where further information may be found’. I look forward to receiving your questions.   Below are several e-mail  conversations  with a Brierley  interest.

 

Regards

Richard Watson
Email


 

George Wilson and Brierley Post Office. 

Howell Farm House
Higham Royd
Ackworth Old Hall
Old House on Church Street
Cudworth Pond

Coblers Well
The Old Police House
Bothamhall, Yorkshire and Brierley Manor Rentals
Church Street Brierley
Hanson's Blacksmiths
The Crowther family of Higham and links with Burntwood Hall
Hoyland Family in Brierley
Revised 27th. February 2010 with new information regarding the earlier building date for Brierley Hall.

Hall Farm Brierley
A possible tunnel
Ringstone Hill

George Wilson and Brierley Post Office.

 

I'm researching my family tree and have traced an ancestor back to Brierley.  I'm interested in finding out a bit more about Brierley and in particular the places associated with my ancestors.

 

My great great great grandfather was George Wilson who was the postmaster in Brierley as shown on the 1861 census.  His address was Prospect Cottage - does this still exist?  I believe his mother was called Ann and his daughter Annie Wilson (born around 1847) was my great great grandmother.  The name of his mother is the furthest back I have managed to trace this part of my family tree, I don't know what his fathers name was or what his mother's maiden name was.

 

I would be interested to hear from anyone that knows any information about George or his family.  Or if anyone has any photographs old or new of Prospect Cottage or the post office.

 

laura.hammersley@btinternet.com

 
Hello Laura

My on line booklet ‘Brererley A History of Brierley’ has references to Brierley Post office and George Wilson.

I have had chance to look through my local history archives, and found these details.

William White’s West Riding Trades Directory for 1838 lists a George Wilson as a shoemaker at South Hiendley near Brierley. The Directory for 1852 has James Wilson as a farmer in South Hiendley.

There had been a post office in Brierley since about 1840 when it stood close to the Three Horse Shoes Inn but no one by the name of Wilson on the trades lists.

The 1861 census has George Wilson aged 40 as a Saddler and Post Master at Prospect Cottage with his wife Martha 34 daughters Ann 14 and Emily? 10, and Ann Wilson 83 born in Royston about 4 miles from Brierley, she was the mother of George. George was born in Shafton about a mile from Brierley. He must have lived in Brierley since 1847 or earlier as his children were born here.

The 1881 census has George  Wilson aged 60 born in Felkirk (Shafton) Postmaster & Saddler on Church St. Brierley, with his wife Martha aged 54 born in Felkirk (Brierley).

Later the Post Office was moved to Cross Hills close to the junction with Frickley Bridge Lane. Post Master Miss. Bertha Corbridge. Then by 1938 it had been moved to it present location again close to the Three horse Shoes Inn Post Master Mrs. Margaret Fry.

 

Prospect Cottage on Church Street Brierley stood close to the east side of Brierley School and a few buildings west of the Farriers Arms Inn on the corner of  Common Road, now a renovated cottage. There is a good chance that it was the long house that later became Fiddling farm house. This was recently demolished to make way for the new Church Gate housing estate.

George Wilson was related to the Cooper and Wilson families that occupied Folly Hall Brierley in the period 1851 to 1891  

 

Folly Hall
Folly Hall Brierley

 

Howell Farm House 

Howell House stands in a hollow just east of Howell Lane between Burntwood Hall near Brierley and the village of Clayton. Howell lane is an ancient ridge road that runs on the high land between the river Dearne and Ea Beck valleys. Howell Spring near the house feeds into a stream flowing into the Ea Beck. 

The House was a Grange or out lying farm belonging to Nostell Priory. The Priory was dissolved 20th. November 1540. Howell House went with the rest of the Nostell estate to Dr. Thomas Leigh and soon afterwards to Sir Thomas Gargrave. 

In 1568 Howell House passed to Thomas Normanvile. It was described as ‘A capitol messuage called Holewell or Hovel Hall in the parish of Thurnscoe with a wood of 160 acres’. 

The historian Joseph Hunter writing in 1828/31 describes Howell House as ‘The Grange of Holy Well or Howell with lands in Thurnscoe, Darfield, and Houghton, together with Howell Wood of 160 acres.’

A widowed farmer called Mary Wood lived with her family there from 1834 to 1851. She held  151  acres  and employed two farm workers.

In 1881 the house was occupied by Mary Ann Hirst also a widow aged 46 who was born in      Clayton and farmed 101 acres employing 3 men. Her daughters Louisa Ann aged 11 & Geregiana aged 7 and son George Herbert  aged 5 were born in Upper Midhope Penistone. James Aspinall aged 26 nephew of Mary and born in Brighouse was the Manager of The Farm (Farm Bailiff)

Joseph Bedford 43 born in Thurnscoe and Charles Marshall 20 born in Arksey were farm workers.

The family were still there in 1891, and Kelly’s West Riding Directory for 1893 lists Mrs. Ann Hirst as a farmer at Howell House Thurnscoe. 

An archaeological aerial survey taken in the 1970s found traces of ancient fields just to the north west of Howell House. These could be connected to other ancient fields relating to the Celtic or Iron Age fort just over one mile north at South Kirkby. 

The building has seen may changes it has masonry and internal timbers that may date from time when it was still a Grange of Nostell. The window frames have been changed and a pan tile roof added probably in the last 200 years.

Howell House Farm
Howell Farm House


Ringstone Hill

Hello Richard,

Do you have any knowledge of Ringstone Hill. South Kirkby Hill Fort is nearby. Is Ringstone Hill an ancient henge type site. I see that there are some stones there. Are these part of a SESKU. (South Elmsall South Kirby, Upton community) project?

Thanks,   Alan 

Thank you for your email Alan.

Ringstone Hill should not be confused with the SESKU folly near the household waste site on Holmsley Lane. The location of the ancient Ringstone Hill is a few hundred yards west off the Brierley to Great Houghton road. There is now an old farm, and two undercover water reservoirs on the hill top.

You will find a write up of the known history of the Iron age fort in South Kirby and Ringstone Hill on my web site in the first chapter of my on line booklet Brererley a history of Brierley.

 

Regards Richard 

Hello Richard,

Thank you for the reply. It has cleared up that question. I've looked at your interesting well researched site. I went to your links page and found Barnsley Family History Society, which I hope may assist in my family research.

Thanks once again,
Alan formerly of South Kirkby.


A possible tunnel

Hi  Richard

         My name is Gary Keele, I was born in Brierley (Hillside Cres.) 1969 left in 1994, When I was younger I was told of a possible tunnel from Cordeux corner to Brierley Common. Is the this true? In the wall as you walk up from Hillside to Brierley Club, there is what looks like a filled in tunnel entrance in the high stone wall at the bottom of a front garden is this the tunnel entrance?

 

 

Thank you for your email Gary. There  are many tunnel stories relating to older buildings in the area. There existence is difficult to prove true or not. But there are problems with them. They are often described as connecting buildings of different ages, and ventilation in long tunnels is impossible. Coal mines, which are effectively long tunnels, need an elaborate ventilation system to make them viable. Air has to be pumped or pulled through the workings.

The blocked entrance in the old stone wall was the Cobblers Well it was closed for safety about 50 years ago.

Regards

Richard

 



Hall Farm Brierley

This was written in answer to an email regarding Percy Townend of Hall Farm Brierley. Percy was Born in Hemsworth in 1890 and moved to Hall Farm Brierley c1927. He retired to live at Hemsworth Grove Farm in 1957. Hall Farm then became the home of the Baxendale family.
James Townend the grandfather of Percy was born in South Hiendley and moved to Hemsworth where he was a Butcher and Market Gardener, his shop was on what is now Market Street.
 

In Kelly’s 1893 West Riding of York Directory
James H. M. Townend & Richard Townend are listed as butchers in Hemsworth. Richard was also assistant registrar to Hemsworth Rural District Council. He had spent some time a teacher in a private school in the village of Smalley Derbyshire.

Hall Farm House




Hoyland Family in Brierley
 

I have been fortunate to see some documents relating to the Hoyland, of Brierley dated 1925 when the family had left the area. This prompted me to publish this short history.

In 1662 John Hoyland paid 5 rent to Brierley manor for Speight farm in the village, in 1701and 1720 a John Hoyland paid quite high rents of 40 to the manor.
Then in his will dated 20th. May 1731 John Hoyland wrote of his own house in which he now lived at Brierley. This had orchards and gardens,  and is the  first  mention of the building  that was to  become known  to us a Brierley  Hall

1806 Militia list has no Hoyland’s eligible for service recorded in Brierley

1841 census has John Hoyland aged 45 of independent means , Mary his wife 45,  and his son John 9  at the mansion later to become known as BrierleyHall. This had been the name of Lindley house up to about 1850.

Robert Holand aged 44 a solicitor, Elizabeth 39 his wife were at  Lindley House Brierley.

They were also in the 1838 Directory and the 1840 tithe survey

1851 Census has John Hoyland Gentleman 57 born in Felkirk parish which includes Brierley, Mary his wife 57 born in Sheffield, John Hoyland 19 born in Felkirk now a student at Oxford at Brierley Hall.

Robert Hoyland 54 attorney & solicitor  born in Felkir k

Elizabeth his wife 49 born in Sheffield, Sarah his daughter 21 born in Felkirk  at Lindley House. 

1860 Rev. John Hoyland of Brierley was inducted as Vicar of Felkirk                   

1861 Census John Hoyland Gentleman 67 born in Felkirk, Mary his wife 69 born in Sheffield, at Brierley Hall

Robert Hoyland 64 attorney & solicitor  born in Brierley widower,

Sarah his daughter 31 born in Brierley now the wife of  Rev. G.P. Cordeux, Mary F E Cordeux daughter 2 born in Cheltenham Gloucestershire  visiting  at Lindley House                    

Rev. John Hoyland Vicar of Felkirk 29 born in Brierley, Mary Ann Hirst 29 born in Carlton, general servant, at South Hiendley in Felkirk vicarage.

1869 John, Robert, Rev. John Hoyland, and Rev. G.P. Cordeux are on the Brierley School deeds which they helped to found.

1871 Census has John Hoyland Landowner 77 born in Felkirk widower. Ann Stacey inlaw 70 spinster born in Sheffield at Brierley Hall

Robert Hoyland 74 attorney & solicitor  born in Brierley widower

Sarah his daughter 41 born in Brierley now the wife of 

Rev. G.P. Cordeux, 42 born in Barnsley, Curate of Brierley

Edith M Cordeux daughter 8 born in Brierley
Edith lived in the village for many years some older residents still remember her. She founded the Church Insitute on Church Street which is now a working mans club.

Robert H Cordeux son 6 born in Brierley

Edward H Cordeux son 5 born in Brierley all at Lindley House.
 

Rev. John Hoyland 39 Vicar of Felkirk and landowner

Mary Ann Hoyland wife 38 born in Barnsley with children

Alice aged 6, Clare 4, Clement E. 1, & Fannie 10 months all born in Felkirk  (at South Hiendley vicarage)                  

1874 Rev. John Hoyland retired as vicar of Felkirk       

 

1881 Census at Brierley Hall Church Street Brierley      

        

John Hoyland aged 49          Born in Felkirk,  Clergyman Without Care Of Souls M.A.Oxford

Mary Ann  his wife 48          Felkirk, and his two children at home both scholars Fanny I.       10 Felkirk. John Henry         9 Felkirk,  the other children Alice and Clare Hoyland are listed at a London boarding school, Clement E. Hoyland is listed at a Doncaster boarding school the same year.

At Lindley House Brierley  

Godfrey P. Cordeux  52 Born in Barnsley       Clergyman Without Care Of Souls

Sarah his wife 51  Felkirk,  and child, Edith   18 Felkirk,

Anne Stacey an aunt aged 81 born in Sheffield. Sarah Mitchell aged 23 a domestic servant born in Thurlstone.

 

1891 Census  has Alice, Clare, and Fanny Hoyland living alone at Brierley Hall

Godfey P. Cordeux with his wife Sarah at Lindley House.
By this time Clement Edward Hoyland had become a mining engineer an was visiting friends in Doncaster on the day of the 1891
census.


1893 Directory  has Rev. John Hoyland at Brierley Hall.

1901 Census has Rev. John Hoyland with his wife Mary born in Barnsley, Alice born in Hunningley, Clare & Fanny born in South Hiendley, living at  Brierley Hall. Clement Edward Hoyland is not on this census, he may have been out of the country, this was the time of the South Africa War.

Godfrey P. Cordeux was retired and living alone at Lindley House

1903 Clement E. Hoyland bought land at Brierley Gap to build a home. This is now the Robin Hood night club.

A Gap is a crossing point on a watershed, In this case it is between the rivers Don and Calder valleys.

Rev. John Hoyland is in the 1908 directory at Brierley Hall

Rev. John Hoyland died in 1910,  his  wife  Mary  and daughter Alice  moved to live in a house overlooking the Stray at  Harrrogate.  Clement  Edward  and his  wife   Louse  Eddie  Hoyland  were  staying  at The Grange  Hotel,  Grange  Over  Sands,  Lancashire  on the day of the  1911  census.  Having  sold his house at Brierley Gap he was listed as being of independent means.

 

Brierley Gap was purchased by Hemsworth RDC, and other Hoyland land in Brierley went to  the Cordeux family.

By 1912 Alfonso Wood is listed a living at  Brierley Hall.

1925 Clement E. Hoyland is listed as the owner occupier of Brinkworth Hall, Elvington York, probably at the time of his sale of the property.

For more on the history of Brierley Hall please see the 'People of Brierley' page in my on line booklet
 'Brereley a history of Brierley'

 



Higham Royd

Dear Richard,

      I have recently researched my family history as far back as a George Holland who, in the 1881 census, lists his birthplace as Higham Royd circa 1838. I would be greatly interested to learn if any reference to this surname exists in local records and would certainly appreciate any pointers which may aid my further research.

                                  Yours sincerely

                                                            Paul Holland 

Hello Paul

If you go to this web site http://www.old-maps.co.uk/ and search for Higham, then select the one in Yorkshire, the 1854 Ordnance survey 6" map will centre on the village. Higham Royd is an isolated farm house about half a mile north west of the village. The 1851 census for Barnsley area could be useful to you it is the first one to have the place of birth shown and may show up the Holland family at Higham. Barnsley Archives have a copy of this, the email address is Archives@barnsley.gov.uk. The library has been closed for refurbishment but should be open again by open now.

Regards

Richard
 

Thank you

 Paul Holland



Ackworth Old Hall 

Hello Richard,
 My name is Bonnie Watson-Padgett.  My husband and I  with friends went to  Mexico for vacation.  We met a couple for West Yorkshire, England.  Their last name was Watson the same as my maiden name. So, that in it's self got us talking.  After a week talking and playing water volleyball with their children, Debi Watson invited us and/or all our friends to visit them if  we were ever in England.   Now, to my question.  Debi said they live in a  haunted home. So, I've tried to find it on the internet with no luck.  Do you anything about this home? Ackworth Old Hall West Yorkshire. Any help will be greatly appreciated.
Thanks, Bonnie Padgett Clarksville USA

Ackworth Old Hall
Ackworth Old Hall


Hello Bonnie
Than you for your email. Yes I know Ackworth Old Hall it is about 7 miles from my home.It is an Elizabethan Hall built about 1580. In 1715 it was occupied by Rev. M. Lee and in 1893 by a farmer called John Waites. I Could not comment on its being haunted that is out of my field.
Ackworth Old Hall is to the west of the Church on Purston Lane B6421, it is marked on some maps as just 'Hall'.
Regards
Richard

Hello Richard,
Thank you so much for the information and picture.  It has been a lot of help.  If you know the Watson's that own Ackworth Hall now, please, tell them hello from the Tennessee Watson's( maiden name) they met in Mexico.  It has been nice talking to you and thanks again for your help.
Bonnie Padgett

Old House on Church Street 

Hi Richard 

I have taken a few photographs of the old house on Church Street  next to the Church being demolished   I intend to put a little bit on the Brierley Village web site news page and also for the Baipip archives. I wondered if you had any details about its history that I could use. 

Regards

Gary

 

Hello Gary

Yes it was a good house shame it had to go. A Miss. Watson lived there for some time. It was built about 1930. The 1919 Ordnance Survey map does not show it, but the 1938 one has the house marked. Hope this is useful.

Regards

Richard

Hi Richard

Thank you

Cudworth Pond

Hello Richard

Reflecting on my early days in Cudworth a question popped into my head the other day: why was that space in the centre of the village referred to as the "pond" is it a corruption of pound (of the livestock-containing sort) or was there a pond there? Something else that I need to look into, for purposes of thoroughness, is the origins of the village. Whereas many of the villages round about seem to have arisen due to the discovery of coal, Cudworth, I suspect, had a longer (if undistinguished) history? But even that is a questionable statement. Did Grimethorpe exist before the pit-head? Come to think of it, it probably did. The coal owners would develop their pits around a source of labour an existing village - and if the coal is down there anyway, it did not matter where the shaft was dug, did it? Then, as the need for labour grew, the so the village expanded. Am I correct?

Mike
 

Hello Mike

Cudworth takes its name from an Anglo-Saxon settler 'Cuda 's enclosure' it was in Anglian Northumbria (Yorkshire & Northumberland) close to Saxon Mercia (midland counties), worth is a Saxon place ending. The river Don was the accepted boundary. Grimethorpe was a Viking/Norse setlement or Grimr's Thorpe on the edge of  Anglo-Saxon Brierley, it never grew to more than a few farms  as the area became part of Brierley Manor deer park. So both have a long history. Following the opening of deep coal mines in the area Cudworth became a dormitory village for the incoming work force. In 1891 the population was only 1,607, by 1911 it was 6,824. That was the period when most of the terrace houses were built. There was a second phase of building c1930 when Newtown Avenue, Birkwood Avenue, The secondary Modern School, and most of the Barnsley Road shops were developed.
regards
Richard

Thanks
Mike



Coblers Well
Hi Richard, we have not lived in Brierley long. We are really eager to find photo’s of the well we have bricked up in our front wall on Church Street opposite the Farriers Arms, and any information about it. The plot of land our house was built on was known as Jennet Croft. There are two dwellings and a joiners shop marked on an early plan of the site.

Kind Regards

Gareth & Deborah

 

Hello Gareth & Deborah

Thank you for your email.

The Tithe Award Survey 1840 shows Jennet Croft as one acre of arable land owned by John Hoyland of Brierley Hall Church St. Brierley, and farmed by John Wilkinson of Grimethorpe. His farm house was close to what is now Windmill Avenue. The well is marked a Coblers Well (Cobblers) on the 1893  6" Ordnance Survey map of the village. There were no buildings on the site at that time. The next map I have is the 1919 Ordnance Survey, this shows the present buildings. I would be interested to see what buildings were there in the period 1894 to 1918. Unfortunately I do no know of any photo's of the well but will let you know if one turns up.

The  wells which  had served the villages for centuries  were  inadequate  for the increasing population following the opening of  Grimethopre Colliery.  Hemsworth  R.D.C. built a  reservoir  at Ringstone Hill  to supply  Brierley and Grimethorpe with piped water for the first time in their history. What a change this would have been for the older residents.


Regards

Richard

 


The Old Police House

Old Police House Brierley


This was written in answer to a question from a visitor to my home.

    The 1840 tithe award for Brierley was a complete survey of the village with every plot of land accounted for. Plot 169 was  Pit Hill field, this was three quarters of an acre of land owned by William Attee’s heir and farmed by Benjamin Bedford in 1840. The pair of Houses in the photo above were built on this plot in 1851.       One of these was the home in 1852 of William Watson who was born in Brierley in 1801, he had lived in Monk Bretton and Cawthorne where his eldest child was born in 1838. He was the part owner of Proctor & Watson’s White House coal mine at Barnsley Road Shafton. This is now a kennels that stands back from the road. 
    It was known as the Police Station by 1871 when James Barritt of Skipton was the sergeant. In 1881 Thomas  Horne aged 37 born in Eversley, Berkshire,  was living in this house as a Police Sergeant with his wife Harriet and children Henry, George, Annis, Mary, & Harriet all  born in Barnsley. Two more children, Thomas aged 2 and Lily aged 1 were born in Brierley.  By  1891  this house  was  known  as  a  Police  Office  when  the  Sergeant  was  Christopher  Taylor. 
Kelly’s Directory for  1893 has Sergeant Talor at Brierley Police Station.  


The other house was the home of Thomas Rogerson a stone mason and the builder of the houses.  Charles  Rogerson the son of  Thomas also a Stone Mason  who had lived in Liverpool for a while, occupied this  house with his wife Sarah, and children Anne & Charles,  from about  1881 to 1891     

Edward Watson is the next known occupier he was a Haulage Contractor based there in 1927. The Watson family lived there for some time and used the land as a coal and wood yard. These houses are now 24 & 26 Barnsley Road/Ket Hill Lane

The pair of houses are not on the 1849 Ordnance Survey 6” map but were built quite soon after the survey. They are shown on the 1893 edition. They are well built in stone and are quite up market in a Victorian style.

        Providence Terrace now gone was at what were Nos. 33-35-39 Barnsley Road. No. 35 was the Police                         Sergeants’  house,  Joseph Little from Stourbridge was the sergeant here in 1861. Much later No. 31 Barnsley              Road was a police house.

Bothamhall, Yorkshire and Brierley Manor Rentals


Dear Richard  

Have you ever heard of Bothamhall, Yorkshire.  When I search with Google for Bothomhall, one of the links I get is 17th Century Brierley.  There is a possibility that my gt, gt, gt, gt grandfather was James Rangeley who married an Elizabeth Sykes and we found the following information on the net in the Savile of Rufford papers at Nottingham County Record Office: Copy of case for Plaintiff and opinion by John Stanhope dated 12 Jan 1761 on suit of Sykes against Rangley and another in The Common Pleas re water course at Bothomhall (Bothomhall, Yk) Also Under the Saviles, Brierley Manor had become the head of their estate in South Yorkshire, and in 1662, rents for Brierley Manor were collected in the following townships: Airton with Calton, Skostroppe, Kirkeby and Hanieth, Airton and Otterburn, Barksland, Bothomhall, Brierley, Ackworth, and many others. So, presumably Bothomhall was a village near Brierley?
All the best and thank you in advance for any information you may have of interest or in any direction you can point me?  This grandparent's son was an extraordinary man who aged 51 in 1823, he left his life as a cloth merchant and manufacturer in Leeds and went with his family (except one son) to the 'wilderness' of Maine, USA where he had bought acres of land with two others when he was 26 and he created a settlement which is now known as The Rangeley Lake Region.

Jane Rangeley
----------

Dear Jane

I have located Botham Hall it is a in a district of Huddersfield called Golcar about 4 miles west of the town centre. A. H. Smiths 'West Riding Place Names' lists Bothomhall in Huddersfield as being Bothomhaull in 1464  which became Bottom Hall by 1867. The Savile family of Thornhill near Dewsbury, West Yorkshire, owned about 10 properties there in 1662. At that time following the Civil War they used their Manor at Brierley near Barnsley as the administration centre for their large Yorkshire estate. Airton, Calton, and Skosthorpe, are in the upper Aire valley between Gargrave and Malham, they represent an isolated estate of the Savile family from Thornhill.

I have just been looking at a Huddersfield street map, Botham Hall Road is just east of Golcar and north of Milnsbridge. The old hall was about one third of the way up this road. Savile Street and Thornhill Road are nearby to the east.

Would you mind if I placed an edited copy of these emails on the Ask Richard web page, and on the Ask Richard about Brierley

Hope this is useful to you

Regards

Richard
-----

Dear Richard

Thank you for this and your previous email.  You are most kind.  Please feel free to put something on your website about our exchange. Could you kindly email me when it is up and send me the link? I have now sent off to the records office for a copy of the document in which Rangley and Sykes are mentioned.

With grateful thanks

Jane Rangeley


Church Street Brierley

I have had the privilege to examine a set of deeds relating to Church Street Brierley opposite the Church and Old School. which have helped me to have a clearer picture of the lay out of that part of the village.  

 

In 1806 William Watson then aged 19 was an apprentice blacksmith in Brierley. There were two blacksmiths in the village at that time, Thomas Bedford and William Schooley. In 1838 when William Watson was listed as Victualler and Blacksmith in Brierley.  In 1852 the Watson family held the Farriers Arms Inn and again in 1877 a William Watson was listed as a blacksmith, and another as an Inn Keeper at The Farriers Arms. Farrier is another name for a blacksmith especially one working with horses.

By 1881 the Watson family had a shop and blacksmiths on Church Street. William Watson senior aged 51 held the shop. William Watson aged 29 was a blacksmith and lived with his widowed mother Mary. They employed one more blacksmith, but by 1893 the two William Watson’s are listed as a grocer and a farmer. By this date the blacksmiths shop had ceased to operate as a business but the name is used on later deeds. A William Watson died in Brierley in 1894

The deeds show quite well the relationship of Watson’s blacksmith’s shop to the village Pinfold and Towns Houses for the Poor. In 1964 the ownership of the Towns Houses needed to be verified by the declaration of two Brierley residents of long standing.

      The lay out of this part of Church Street is now:-

No. 66 which is a general dealers, and 64 were part of plot 25 on the tithe award map of 1840 they were then owned by William Watson Blacksmith. This plot ran back off Church Street towards the Old Wesleyan Methodist Church then along the rear of the Pinfold and the Towns Houses.

No 62 is on the site of the Pinfold. This was anciently in the care of the Pindar who impounded stray animals in the village and made a charge to the owners for their return. On a Brierley Manor court roll dated 1655 Richard Mann was listed as Pindar for the village.

60 & 58 are on plot 24 of the tithe award map of 1840. This was the site of the Towns Houses, these were two cottages in the care of the Overseers to the Poor. It was owned by the George Savile Foljambe. They were demolished in 1948.

The Pinfold and Towns Houses are marked on several 19th. century maps of the village.

A well remembered blacksmiths in Brierley was that of the Hanson family. William Hanson and his father George from Hemsworth took over the blackmiths shop of Joseph Askin which stood on  Church Street opposite the Three Horse Shoes about 1852. William’s grandson George was blacksmith there in 1908. Charles Hanson was Blacksmith there in 1922 and possibly 1927. This blacksmiths shop had closed by 1936.

 

                                           

Hanson's Blacksmiths

Hi Richard, I am researching my family history and can identify my grandfather (Kenyon Hanson) as being born in Clifton Villa, Brierley.  He was born 1907 to Robinson and Ethel Hanson (nee Kenyon).  My grandfather was one of seven children.  Robinson is cited as a Hospital Gardener on my Grandfathers birth certificate. I would be interested to know if Clifton Villa is still standing and where it is.  Do you know anything of the family as my Grandfather never spoke of them. Any other information or pointers in the right direction would be appreciated.

Regards

Paul Hanson

------
Hanson's Blacksmiths 
Hanson's Blacksmith's which stood at the end of Church Street Brierley opposite the Three Horse Shoes Inn.
George and Charles Hanson are seen at their work about 1910. The area is now a strip of land covered by bushes. This photo was kindly given to me by Mr. Donald Hanson of Scunthorpe.

Hello Paul  
   

Here is an extract from some notes of mine on the family. 

"A well remembered blacksmiths in Brierley was that of the Hanson family. William Hanson and his father George from Hemsworth took over the blackmiths shop of Joseph Askin which stood on Church Street opposite the Three Horse Shoes about 1852. William’s grandson George was blacksmith there in 1908. This blacksmiths shop had closed by 1936.”

Regards

Richard

 ---------

Hi Richard, Am I right in my interpretation of your text that the Hanson family had George who had a son William (1830) who had a son George (1858)? Was it George (1858) that was working the Blacksmiths in 1908 or another George that I have no record of? I know the family had ties with Kirk Smeaton and the water mill there.  Do you have anything on that? Do you have any further information that may be of interest or any contacts I may approach?This is getting fascinating, I have only just started looking into my family history! I appreciate all your time and efforts, thank you very much! 

Regards

Paul Hanson

 ---------

Hello Paul

Yes I believe that George born 1858 was the a blacksmith in Brierley in 1908. Charles Hanson was the last Blacksmith he was working in Brierley in 1922 and possibly in 1927. The smithy had closed by 1936. The family first appear in Brierley in White’s West Riding Directory for 1852.  Just checked Kirk Smeaton but have not found a Hanson or Kenyon listed.The Kenyon family were well known in Brierley here is some of their early history. They are first mentioned on the Staincross Mitilia List for 1806. The Militia listed records of all men able to serve in the West Riding of Yorkshire Militia at the time of an expected invasion by France. For Brierley there is Mathew Kennion, note the spelling, he is classed as a poor labourer aged 35 with 3 children. This would make him born in 1771. There are no Kenyons on a 1720 rental for Brierley.

William White’s  Directory of the West Riding 1838 has this entry for Brierley; Mathew Kenyon and Sons, Gardeners.

The 1840 Brierley Tithe award lists Mathew Kenyon as a tenant of the Lord of the Manor, George Savile Foljambe, his cottage was on Common Road, Brierley, the site is now a flower bed at the entrance to the village park. He rented about 15 acres of land from John Hoyland. His sons George and William Kenyon lived in the farm opposite the sharp bend on Church Street next to the Methodist Church.
George Kenyon aged 65 in 1861a farmer and gardener born in Brierley  was the son of  Mathew his wife Ann 64 was born in Darfield. William Kenyon aged 60 in 1861also a  farmer and gardener born in Brierley was the second son of Mathew his wife Mary 60 was born in Treeton near Rotherham.

White’s West Riding Directory for 1852 lists George & William Kenyon as (Market) Gardeners. In 1861

John Kenyon who was born in Brierley  is listed as Farmer & Gardener living at Red House 1n 1881.

Regards

Richard

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Hi Richard,

Many thanks for the information, its most informative!

 

 
The Crowther family of Higham and links with Burntwood Hall

 

Dear Richard

I have a piece of writing by one of my ancestors Polly Crowther, it  is a scrap of paper on which Polly has written several nursery rhymes, and the addresses of friends and relations. At one point on the paper she writes "Composition by Miss P. Crowther, Higham, Barnsley" (the Crowthers lived at Higham Farm), She has also written her address as Miss Crowther, T (or J) Dymond Esq., Burntwood Hall, Brierley, Barnsley. Do you have any more information about the servants living at Burntwood Hall?

Kind regards,

Christine Holgate

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Dear Christine

It is probably T. (Thomas) Dymond on the letter you have, he owned Burnwood from about 1868 and died in 1900.

Is this your family please?

1881 census Higham   William Crowther widower aged 83.    Handicap: Blind  Farmer Of 120 Acres born in Barugh  to the west of Barnsley 

Joe     38  Crowther born in Barugh Famers Son   Mary 36 Crowther born in Richmond daughter(in law)   

Jane   11 born in  Higham granddaughter   Scholar  Mary  8 born in  Higham granddaughter       Scholar

Timothy 6 born in  Higham grandson  Scholar    William 3 born in Higham grandson

Emily    1 born in  Higham granddaughter  John Smith 19 born in Higham Farm Servant (Indoor)

George Hirst 55  born in Higham Farm Servant (Indoor)
Ann Hinchliffe 46 born in  Higham Farm Servant (Indoor)

There is also an entry in the Kelly’s West Riding Directory for 1893; Joe Crowther farmer at Higham.

As Polly can be a nickname for Mary I take Mary aged 8 to be your Polly Crowther. If so she was of the right age to have visited Burntwood as a friend of Catherine Dymond at the time Beatrice Tomasson was governess at the hall c1890-1901. Please see my web page Beatrice Tomasson & Dymond Family on my Brierley Yorkshire England  web  site.

Regards

Richard

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 Dear Richard,

Many thanks for all your kind help. I have only just looked at my emails - Jane Crowther was my Great Grandmother, and I already had the census details for 1881, but did not realise that Polly was a nickname for Mary - this has solved the mystery of who Polly was in the piece of writing that I have from my grandmother. I also did not know that William had the handicap "blind" on the census - my grandmother used to say that Willie was blinded by the tail of a horse lashing at him - the family bred horses. I will pursue this further in Barnsley Archives. Thank you very much.

Kind regards,

Christine

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Pleased to be able to help Christine. I have learned more about life at Burntwood Hall from our exchange of information. May I put an edited form of these emails on the Ask Richard web page please?

Regards

Richard

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 Dear Richard,

Yes, you may. The story that my grandmother told about the family was that her mother, Jane had come from quite a wealthy family, but had married beneath herself and had been disowned by the family (she married John William Gill, a farm servant at Biggin Low Green, Harewood) . I started to doubt her story rather, when I found that Jane had lived at Higham Farm, rather than "Higham Old Hall" as my Grandmother had called it. I also found that before she was married, Jane had worked as a house maid at Leathley Hall. This is why I thought that "Polly", or someone else from Jane's family was employed as a servant at Burntwood. Your theory gives credence to idea that the Crowthers indeed thought that they were a cut above other people. I was intrigued by the fact that "Polly" seemed quite well educated (she has good handwriting), and was also puzzled by the fact that there were no Pollys living at Higham as far as I could see. The Crowthers have an entry in an 1838 Trades Directory for their farm at Higham as well.

 

Poor Jane Crowther ended up living in very sad circumstances. Her husband died when he was 33 of diphtheria, and two of her children died at the same time. She was pregnant at the time with my great uncle Fred (who died when he was only 26), and had a four year old daughter (my grandmother Kate) to look after. She had to move from their house to more basic accommodation in Nidd Vale Terrace, and take in washing to survive. She always told my grandmother not to have anything to do with the other children on the street, because she came from a better class of family. Jane died just before my father and his twin brother went to school in 1930. She would have been 60 when she died.

 

 Incidentally, my mother has just told me a story about William Crowther. For quite a while my father had a chair that had belonged to William, which had scorch marks on one side. This was where William had placed it too close to the fire because he could not see where he was putting it.

 

Thanks again,

Best wishes,

Christine

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My interest has always been in how history has shaped the landscape so I like to visit places I have researched. At the weekend I had a chance to visit Higham. It is quite near my home at Brierley.

Thomas Jefferys 1775 map of Yorkshire shows a small cluster of buildings at Higham, and the Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 map 2000 shows Royd Hill Farm at that point. This could be the Crowther’s farm. Among many later farm buildings there is a substantial stone farm house which looks to have been built about 1800, it is built in line with an attached to an older stone building which in now used as a barn

 The M1 motorway runs very close to this farm. Pog Well lane goes from the farm to ‘Higham Bottom’ about 600 yards away. In 1854 this was ‘New Sikstone Coal Mine’. Not surprisingly there were many coal miners living in Higham at that time. The 120 acre farm of Willaim Crowther was quite large. Brierley Manor farm had 180 acres and the farm that my Watson family rented at Cudworth had 80 acres. As horse breeders and dealers the family would have many contacts in  Barnsley area this will be how they came to know the Dymond family of Brierley and Burntwood Hall. The hall is now a care home for the elderly.

Finding Pog Well and  Pog Well Lane near Pogmoor, all in the district of Barugh was interesting. Something I will look at more carefully later, it made me think of a possible Celtic well deity but have now found that Pog is Yorkshire word for a Bog. Gawber Hall is the only large older house I know of in Barugh, it has gone now. Barugh is Berg in some old documents.

Here is how to find the farm on the 'Old Maps' web site Christine  http://www.old-maps.co.uk/.
 

Centre on Higham then go to 'enlarged view'. The farm is on Royd Lane, a foot path is marked crossing the map from a ford on the left, this turns north just short of Pog Well and leads directly to the farm house which is on the north side of Royd Lane.

The c1800 stone farm house has its gable end next to the lane and faces west, It appears to have a garden on the east side. The older building which could be an earlier house comes next in the same line of building. All of this site is part of the farm complex.

Hope this is clear

Richard

 

Yes, I've found it. Higham is bigger than I thought it would be, and I'm not sure I would have been able to locate the farm without your help. The colliery and Pog Well were very clearly marked. Were you able to see evidence of either when you visited Higham?

Best wishes,

Christine

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Pleased to be able to help Christine.

The Silkstone area is well within my range for days out so I know it quite well. The shallower coal mines near Higham such as Silkstone New Colliery were phased out as deeper coal mines to the east of Barnsley were sunk in the 1890s. You would hardly know they had been there.

If you know where to look there are remains of inclined plane railways and tramways leading to Barugh Basin where coal was transferred to the Dearne & Dove Canal. The M1 motorway was built very close to Higham and hides the site of Silkstone New Colliery from the village, there is a just a cottage there now.

The land between the M1 and Pog Well, which was crossed by the footpath on the 1854 map, is now a playing field with goal posts and a small changing room close to the farm. It is several feet below the level of Pog Well Lane. The well is set into the bank at the side of Pog Well Lane and is very overgrown with large bushes.

Higham is on the western boundary of Barnsley's built up area. West of the M1 the countryside changes to open fields and woodland, Silkstone and Cawthorne are very pleasant villages and the Last of the Summer Country is very close by.

regards

Richard

 

Thanks for the information. I have just been looking into the history of Leathley Hall, and have found that it is possible that when my Great Grandmother was living there it was owned by a descendant of Guy Fawkes' cousin. I need to look into this further though.

Best wishes,

Christine

 

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Thank you Christine

I have found working on this project very interesting.

Regards

Richard




 

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